Wireless Electric Eye Massager - White - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Black - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Eye Massager
Wireless Electric Eye Massager - Eye Massager

SK Fashion

Wireless Electric Eye Massager

Regular price $ 300.00 USD Sale price $ 79.97 USD

🔥🔥 93% OF CUSTOMERS BUY 3 OR MORE 🔥🔥

Plush Kids Cartoon bags

Wireless Electric Eye Massager !!!

  •  Flexible buckle and spandex band can be adjusted according to your head size.
  •  180° foldable design conforms to the face contour to suit both fat and thin face.
  •  Only one button for easy operation, with led lights on, the machine starts working.
  •  Built-in rechargeable battery, the wireless eye massager.
  •  Ideal for those who suffer from near sight, far sight, weak sight and insomnia.
ABS outside is durable and easy to clean, inner soft plush material is healthy, comfortable and safe to wear. Intelligent air-pressure massaging, infrared light heating massaging, frequency vibration massaging and music massaging 
It can stimulate blood circulation, relieve nervous, reduce the look of wrinkles, eye bags and dark circles, relax yourself entirely. Effective for relieving eyestrain, dry eyes, bulging eye and mental fatigue, protecting eyesight.

OUR GUARANTEE

At SK Fashion , we strive to offer top and high-quality products in the world.

Your Satisfaction is our Top Priority.

We will provide outstanding customer service to assist you as we highly value our customer satisfaction with absolutely Zero Risk.

If you have any questions about your order, please contact us by emailing us at Support@skfashionhub.com
 

Just click the "Add To Cart" Button Below! There's very limited stock, and they will go soon!

Note: Due to High Demand Promotional Items May Take Up To 2-4 weeks for delivery. 

WE SUPPORT AN AMAZING CAUSE

We're thrilled to support Nanhi Pari Foundation is a Girl Child Right Organization which works for Education, Health & Nutrition for Girl Child.

 

Plush Kids Cartoon bags      Plush Kids Cartoon bags    Plush Kids Cartoon bags     Plush Kids Cartoon bags

SK FASHION'S 7-POINT HAPPINESS CHECKLIST

1. FREE Shipping Worldwide on special offers.
2. Fast, Sure & Safe delivery.
3. Safe Payments.
4.  30 Day Money Back Guarantee.
5. Real humans on our support help-desk! 
6.Tracking number for every order.
7. We use encrypted SSL certificates for 100% security.

Plush Kids Cartoon bags

Eyes Facts

NEWBORN BABIES SEE THE WORLD IN BLACK AND WHITE—AND RED.
“It is a myth that babies see in black and white,” Anna Franklin, leader of the University of Sussex's Baby Lab, told The Guardian. While newborns do see black, white, and shades of gray, they can also detect red objects against a gray backdrop, Franklin says. The reason why they can’t see more colors is because the cones in their eyes—the photoreceptor cells responsible for picking up colors—are too weak to detect them. Those cells quickly get stronger, though. After about two months, babies can distinguish between red and green, and a few weeks later they can tell the difference between blue and yellow.

2. YOUR EYEBALLS GROW AS YOU AGE.
Another common misconception is that your eyes remain the same size from birth to adulthood. As a newborn, your eyes measure about three-fifths of an inch from front to back, compared to a little under an inch in adults. Your eyes actually grow a great deal in the first two years of life, and another growth spurt occurs when you go through puberty. The confusion likely stems from the fact that your eyes as a 6-month-old infant are two-thirds the size they will be when you’re an adult.

3. THE LENGTH OF YOUR EYE PARTLY DETERMINES HOW WELL YOU'LL BE ABLE TO SEE.
If your eyeball is too long or too short, you might end up having problems with your vision. Nearsighted people have eyes that are longer than average, while farsighted people have eyes that come up a little short. If you were to magically add or remove a millimeter of length from your eye, it would completely change your prescription. Aside from eye length, the shape of your cornea (the outer part of the eye where contact lenses are placed) and lens (the part of the eye located behind the iris and pupil) are other key factors that determine the quality of your vision. That's because both of these parts work together to refract light.

4. CONTACT LENSES CAN'T REALLY GET LOST BEHIND YOUR EYE.
Although it may feel like a dislodged contact lens is stuck behind your eye, that isn’t exactly what’s happening. The thin membrane covering the white part of your eye and the underside of your eyelid—called the conjunctiva—forms a pouch and prevents objects from getting behind your eyeball. If a contact lens gets shifted out of place to the point where you can no longer see it, it’s just stuck underneath your upper eyelid, which isn’t nearly as scary.

5. BLUE-EYED PEOPLE SHARE A COMMON ANCESTOR.
Originally, everyone in the world had brown eyes. It wasn’t until around 6000 to 10,000 years ago that the first blue-eyed person was born as a result of a genetic mutation, according to a 2008 study. That mutation of the OCA2 gene essentially “turned off the ability to produce brown eyes” and diluted the color to blue, Professor Hans Eiberg of the University of Copenhagen said in a statement.

6. PARTS OF THE EYE CAN GET SUNBURNED.
There’s a good reason you should wear sunglasses when it’s bright outside. Too much exposure to UV rays can damage the surface of the cornea and conjunctiva, causing a condition akin to sunburn called photokeratitis. Symptoms include pain, red or swollen eyes, the sensation of a foreign body in the eyes, blurred vision, headaches, and seeing halos around lights. While the discomfort is temporary and tends to go away within 48 hours, longer exposure to UV rays can have a long-term effect on your vision and lead to macular degeneration (deterioration of the retina, which is often age-related) and cataracts (clouding of the eye's lens, which reduces the amount of light coming in).

7. YOUR EYE MUSCLES ARE THE FASTEST MUSCLE IN YOUR BODY.
Extraocular muscles are what let you look around in all directions. You have six of these muscles in each eye, and many of the motions they make are involuntary. This lets you flick your eyes to one side and notice something in your peripheral vision without consciously looking in that direction. When both of your eyes move in the same direction, the movement is called a saccade, which comes from the French word for “jerk” (the verb, not the person). These jerky movements are extremely rapid, lasting about 50 to 60 milliseconds per saccade, according to Dr. Reza Shadmehr, professor of biomedical engineering and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University. “Saccadic eye movements are the fastest voluntary movements that we can make. The eyes move at around 500 degrees per second or more,” Shadmehr tells Mental Floss.

8. YOUR EYE MOVEMENTS MIGHT GIVE AWAY YOUR NEXT MOVE.
Shadmehr and other researchers conducted an experiment in 2015 to test the relationship between saccades and decision-making. Participants were placed in front of a computer and asked to choose between two options that appeared on the screen: an immediate reward and a delayed reward. For instance, one option might be “get $10 today,” while the other might be “wait 30 days and get $30.” Their eye movements were tracked the entire time, and researchers discovered that these movements gave away the choice they were about to make before they made it. At the last minute, their eyes would move at a faster velocity towards the option that they preferred.

“What’s interesting is that as the saccades are being made, the velocity of the eyes starts out being equal between these two stimuli, but then right before you decide ‘I like A better than B,' the saccade that you make toward A has a higher velocity than the one you make toward B,” Shadmehr explains. “The idea is that the way you’re evaluating things is reflected in the way you move toward them.”

In another experiment, Shadmehr found a correlation between faster eye movements and impatient and impulsive behaviors. Similarly, other studies have shown that our eye movements are linked to moral decisions and even our political temperament.

9. YOU CAN TELL SOME ANIMALS' PLACE IN THE FOOD CHAIN BY LOOKING AT A PART OF THEIR EYE.
In 2015, vision scientist Martin Banks and his colleagues looked at the eyes of 214 species in an attempt to answer the question, “Why do animal eyes have pupils of different shapes?” By the end of their study, they noticed a few patterns. Predatory animals like big cats and snakes tend to have pupils in the shape of vertical slits. This particular shape gives them the advantage of being able to accurately judge the distance separating them and their prey, so they'll know exactly how far they have to pounce. On the other hand, horizontal pupils are more common in goats, deer, cattle, and other herbivores. This shape improves an animal’s panoramic vision, which helps them look out for predators.

10. AN EYE CONDITION MAY HAVE BEEN PARTLY RESPONSIBLE FOR LEONARDO DA VINCI'S ARTISTIC GENIUS.
Visual neuroscientist Christopher Tyler argued in a recent paper that the master artist behind Mona Lisa had strabismus, a disorder where the eyes are misaligned. Essentially, one of his eyes turned outwards, and he was able to use both of his eyes separately (monocular as opposed to binocular vision). Tyler believes this actually aided his art by improving his ability to render three-dimensional images on a flat canvas. “The condition is rather convenient for a painter, since viewing the world with one eye allows direct comparison with the flat image being drawn or painted,” Tyler said. We’ll never know for sure whether or not this was true for Leonardo, but it’s an intriguing theory.

11. SURGEONS HOPE TO BE PERFORMING WHOLE EYE TRANSPLANTS BY 2026.
Currently, only cornea transplants to improve vision are possible, but a team of Pittsburgh-based transplant surgeons said in 2016 that they hoped to be performing whole eye transplants in humans within the next decade. Transferring an eye from a deceased donor to a recipient certainly won’t be easy, though. A complicated network of muscles, blood vessels, and nerves connects the eyes to the brain via the optic nerve. However, further studies into the optic nerve and recent advances in immunosuppressive drugs and surgical techniques have brought them several steps closer to achieving this goal. If successful, the surgery could restore vision to people who have suffered severe eye injuries. Their research is backed by the Department of Defense, which is concerned about the number of soldiers who sustain eye injuries in combat.


Click to edit the product in Ali Orders.
Note: only show for shop owner