Glass bottle cutter DIY tools - Standard - Glass Cutter
Glass bottle cutter DIY tools - Glass Cutter
Glass bottle cutter DIY tools - Glass Cutter
Glass bottle cutter DIY tools - Glass Cutter
Glass bottle cutter DIY tools - Glass Cutter
Glass bottle cutter DIY tools - Glass Cutter
Glass bottle cutter DIY tools - Glass Cutter

SK Fashion

Glass bottle cutter DIY tools

Regular price $ 80.00 USD Sale price $ 29.97 USD

🔥🔥 93% OF CUSTOMERS BUY 3 OR MORE 🔥🔥

Glass bottle cutter DIY tools

Glass bottle cutter DIY tools !!!

The beauty of decor designs for your home and garden made from old bottles of wine is irresistible. You have many old bottles and also want to decorate your own home. You absolutely can! By your creative recycle ideas and handmade practice, decorate your exclusive beautiful life and help you do your bit for the environment protection. Recycle Your Glass Bottles create your own artwork. Buy this awesome cutter now!

 

Just click the "Add To Cart" Button Below! There's a very limited stock, and they will go soon!

Note:

Due to High Demand Promotional Items May Take Up To 7-10 days for delivery in USA. 

Due to High Demand Promotional Items May Take Up To 2-4 weeks for delivery to Others. 

WE SUPPORT AN AMAZING CAUSE

We're thrilled to support Nanhi Pari Foundation is a Girl Child Right Organization which works for Education, Health & Nutrition for Girl Child.

 

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Glass bottle cutter DIY tools

Glass cutter Facts

A glass cutter is a tool used to make a shallow score in one surface of a piece of glass that is to be broken in two pieces. The scoring makes a split in the surface of the glass which encourages the glass to break along the score. Regular, annealed glass can be broken apart this way but not tempered glass as the latter tends to shatter rather than breaking cleanly into two pieces.

A glass cutter may use a diamond to create the split, but more commonly a small cutting wheel made of hardened steel or tungsten carbide 4–6 mm in diameter with a V-shaped profile called a "hone angle" is used. The greater the hone angle of the wheel, the sharper the angle of the V and the thicker the piece of glass it is designed to cut. The hone angle on most hand-held glass cutters is 120°, though wheels are made as sharp as 154° for cutting glass as thick as 0.5 inches (13 mm).Their main drawback is that wheels with sharper hone angles will become dull more quickly than their more obtuse counterparts. The effective cutting of glass also requires a small amount of oil (kerosene is often used) and some glass cutters contain a reservoir of this oil which both lubricates the wheel and prevents it from becoming too hot: as the wheel scores, friction between it and the glass surface briefly generates intense heat, and oil dissipates this efficiently. When properly lubricated a steel wheel can give a long period of satisfactory service. However, tungsten carbide wheels have been proven to have a significantly longer life than steel wheels and offer greater and more reproducible penetration in scoring as well as easier opening of the scored glass.

In the Middle Ages, glass was cut with a heated and sharply pointed iron rod. The red hot point was drawn along the moistened surface of the glass causing it to snap apart. Fractures created in this way were not very accurate and the rough pieces had to be chipped or "grozed" down to more exact shapes with a hooked tool called a grozing iron. Between the 14th and 16th centuries, starting in Italy, a diamond-tipped cutter became prevalent which allowed for more precise cutting. Then in 1869 the wheel cutter was developed by Samuel Monce of Bristol, Connecticut, which remains the current standard tool for most glass cutting.

Large sheets of glass are usually cut with a computer-assisted CNC semi-automatic glass cutting table. These sheets are then broken out by hand into the individual sheets of glass (also known as "lites" in the glass industry).


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